Spot the difference: early 19th century edition
Archaeology / Travel / Weird and Wonderful

Spot the difference: early 19th century edition

Google Earth: with a few clicks, we’re ‘holidaying’ anywhere in the world without ever leaving home – the ultimate in ‘armchair’ travel. While the technology is relatively new the concept certainly isn’t, and for ages past the human race have told stories which can transport them to far away lands without the hassle of passports, … Continue reading

‘A World of Fragile Parts’ at the Venice Architecture Biennale
Archaeology / Museums

‘A World of Fragile Parts’ at the Venice Architecture Biennale

Recently I went to see the Architecture Biennale in Venice and its exhibition entitled ‘A World of Fragile Parts’. This was curated by Brendan Cormier from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and explored the idea that making copies of things is a way of preventing the loss of material heritage. Having this show in … Continue reading

Impaled heads and destroyed memory at the British Museum
Archaeology / Discussion / History / Museums / Reviews / Uncategorized

Impaled heads and destroyed memory at the British Museum

Deface, purify, obliterate, rip off, slash, delete, desecrate, erase, condemn, smooth over, destroy, mutilate. These are the different words used in the British Museums’ new display entitled ‘Defacing the past: damnation and desecration in imperial Rome’ to illustrate the actions taken by people against the images and names of those in power. Some of the … Continue reading

Lego, Pompeii, and the power of anachronism
Archaeology / Classics and pop culture / Museums

Lego, Pompeii, and the power of anachronism

While doing research for my PhD thesis I’ve been thinking a lot about the idea of anachronism. Broadly defined, anachronism means taking something from one historical time period and placing it in another. This can mean attributing modern ideas to ancient people, judging them by our values (or us by theirs), or it can mean … Continue reading

Where have all the tourists gone?
Archaeology / Random thoughts / Travel

Where have all the tourists gone?

According to the Culture and Tourism Provincial Directorate, the site of Ancient Ephesus welcomed nearly 2 million visitors in 2013. That’s around two thirds of the total visitor population to archaeological and heritage sites in the whole İzmir region: around the same number of people who visit the Athenian Acropolis or Pomepii per annum, and … Continue reading