Reading (and writing) between the lines of history
Archaeology / Random thoughts / Travel / Weird and Wonderful

Reading (and writing) between the lines of history

The rest, they say, is history. And then some. For the next three months, I’m swapping the fens of Cambridge for the industrial heart of the Ruhr valley in western Germany, and my new pied-à-terre is the Institute of Archaeology at the Ruhr Universität in Bochum. While I’m here, I’m looking through the paper archives … Continue reading

Classically-Themed April Fools’ Jokes
Classics and pop culture / Random thoughts / Weird and Wonderful

Classically-Themed April Fools’ Jokes

If a Roman poet were to write a Fasti on the notable dates of the modern Western calendar, April Fools’ Day on April 1st would surely deserve a mention. As with many ancient festivals, this day – although not a public holiday – witnesses the disruption of social and cultural norms, as friends and media … Continue reading

Spot the difference: early 19th century edition
Archaeology / Travel / Weird and Wonderful

Spot the difference: early 19th century edition

Google Earth: with a few clicks, we’re ‘holidaying’ anywhere in the world without ever leaving home – the ultimate in ‘armchair’ travel. While the technology is relatively new the concept certainly isn’t, and for ages past the human race have told stories which can transport them to far away lands without the hassle of passports, … Continue reading

Lysistrata – a view from the surtitle box
Classics and pop culture / Weird and Wonderful

Lysistrata – a view from the surtitle box

As the dust settles on the 2016 Greek Play (Antigone/Lysistrata), I and the 5000+ other people lucky enough to have snagged a ticket to this sell-out performance can’t stop singing the praises of the cast. Natasha Cutler was a powerful and natural leader as Lysistrata, and she made speaking Ancient Greek look stylishly effortless.  Rosanna … Continue reading

Thirteen Swords: Adventures in Bronze Age Metal-working
Archaeology / Events / Reviews / Travel / Weird and Wonderful

Thirteen Swords: Adventures in Bronze Age Metal-working

I’ve always wanted a sword. Ever since I was a knights-and-castles-obsessed little boy, I’ve wanted one. Doing classics, and then moving into East Mediterranean archaeology, did nothing to diminish this need, but it did make me realise one important point: Bronze Age swords are much cooler than their mediaeval counterparts. In the stressful times of … Continue reading