Archaeology / Graduate Interdisciplinary Seminar / History / Museums

GIS 13/10/17 – Graduates at the Museum of Classical Archaeology and Syriac retellings of the Fall of Troy

The first GIS of this term started out on Friday 13th October, with two truly interdisciplinary papers. First, Alina Kozlovski, a fourth-year PhD student, briefly presented two current graduates schemes at the Museum of Classical Archaeology at the Faculty of Classics, the ‘Grad Tour’ and the ‘Grads Curate’. The ‘Grad Tour’, which has been met … Continue reading

Review: Archaeological Museum of Thebes
Archaeology / History / Museums / Reviews / Travel

Review: Archaeological Museum of Thebes

Reporting live from the trowel’s edge… For the next six weeks, Ricarda and I are sweating it out in the middle of the Greek countryside, all in the service of academic discovery and for the advancement of human knowledge. We’re part of a team excavating a Mycenaean chamber tomb in Boeotia, a synergasia (collaboration) project … Continue reading

‘A World of Fragile Parts’ at the Venice Architecture Biennale
Archaeology / Museums

‘A World of Fragile Parts’ at the Venice Architecture Biennale

Recently I went to see the Architecture Biennale in Venice and its exhibition entitled ‘A World of Fragile Parts’. This was curated by Brendan Cormier from the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and explored the idea that making copies of things is a way of preventing the loss of material heritage. Having this show in … Continue reading

Impaled heads and destroyed memory at the British Museum
Archaeology / Discussion / History / Museums / Reviews / Uncategorized

Impaled heads and destroyed memory at the British Museum

Deface, purify, obliterate, rip off, slash, delete, desecrate, erase, condemn, smooth over, destroy, mutilate. These are the different words used in the British Museums’ new display entitled ‘Defacing the past: damnation and desecration in imperial Rome’ to illustrate the actions taken by people against the images and names of those in power. Some of the … Continue reading

Lego, Pompeii, and the power of anachronism
Archaeology / Classics and pop culture / Museums

Lego, Pompeii, and the power of anachronism

While doing research for my PhD thesis I’ve been thinking a lot about the idea of anachronism. Broadly defined, anachronism means taking something from one historical time period and placing it in another. This can mean attributing modern ideas to ancient people, judging them by our values (or us by theirs), or it can mean … Continue reading